Membership of the SRA, which is a non-profit company registered under the Companies Act, is open to all the registered property owners who are encouraged to apply for membership so that they may exercise their rights to influence the business of the SRA. Membership cannot be denied to a registered property owner and as a member the property owner is entitled to attend, participate and vote at members meetings of the Company held under the auspices of the Companies Act.

Should a member be unable to attend they may give another individual their proxy to attend and vote on their behalf. Non-members may attend and participate at members’ meetings but cannot vote and as such may thus have limited influence on the SRA’s activities.

Membership application forms can be downloaded from the link below – once complete please send the form back to info@strandbid.co.za

Click below to download the Membership Application Form

  • From Saturday 1 December 2018, water restrictions and the associated tariffs will be lowered from Level 5 to Level 3 recovery restrictions, which includes increasing the daily usage from 70 litres per person per day to 105 litres per person per day; or from 500 million litres to 650 million litres of collective usage per day
  • Tariffs will also be lowered to Level 3. If for example residents use less than 6 000 litres per month (Step 1) they can expect to pay 35,5% less
  • This decision follows on from the National Department of Water and Sanitation’s latest water assessment
  • Restrictions remain on a fairly strict recovery level as a precaution to deal with rainfall uncertainty in 2019 and 2020
  • We encourage Cape Town’s water ambassadors to maintain their water-wise approach during the recovery phase and as the metro moves towards becoming a more water-sensitive city in the near future
  • The 40% restriction on water usage applicable to businesses has been removed but the sector is strongly encouraged to continue implementing and investigating the further efficient use of water in their operations

 

The City of Cape Town’s water users can expect a considerable reduction in the cost of water to be reflected in their municipal invoices from next month. This is due to the lowering of water restrictions from Level 5 to Level 3 recovery restrictions from Saturday1 December 2018.

 

The City views 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the unprecedented drought.

 

This decision to lower restrictions comes after a meeting between the National Department of Water and Sanitation and the water users of the Western Cape Water Supply System, namely the agricultural sector, Western Cape Government, municipalities and the Cape Town metro regarding the water assessment for the year ahead.

 

Based on National Government’s assessment of the hydrological year, a saving of between 10% and 20% for urban water users has been proposed. However, the City has decided to implement a more cautious 30% saving to help with the recovery of the dams and to cater for the uncertainty that exists around rainfall volumes and frequency in 2019.

 

‘I want to thank all the residents, officials, and visitors to Cape Town who played their part in helping us get through one of the worst droughts this city has ever seen. While the drought is not yet over, we have seen that there is room to bring some relief to our residents. I know it has been tough and I hope that this reduction in tariffs will bring some comfort over the festive season. We will still need to be water-wise though, as we do not know what the next rainy season holds.

 

‘We are no longer in a period of extreme scarcity, but it does not mean that we should forego some of the great water-wise ways that we have made a part of our daily lives – and for which we have become world famous. We are situated in a water-scarce region and the water-wise efforts and ways to diversify and augment our water supply should and will continue.

 

‘If one looks at international drought experience, water restrictions are either implemented too late or lifted too early. Hence our decision to take a conservative approach to the recovery while we continue to monitor the situation,’ said the City’s Executive Mayor, Alderman Dan Plato.

 

The City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Informal Settlements, Water and Waste Services; and Energy, Councillor Xanthea Limberg added: ‘We see 2019 as a recovery year after having successfully emerged from the severe and unprecedented drought. Based on our own assessment, we are following a conservative approach in the light of rainfall uncertainty over the coming two years. These Level 3 recovery restrictions are also a measure to help support the great change we have seen in the relationship that we have with water while, at the same time, providing some financial relief to residents and businesses. This is not only a period of recovery for our dams, but also for our economy as a whole as well as for our residents and businesses who truly made huge sacrifices to help us get Cape Town through the drought.’

 

Due to the extreme economic and rural hardship that has been suffered as a result of the drought, the agricultural sector will only reduce water usage by 10% as it too enters a period of recovery. The City fully supports this move as the agricultural sector also supported the City as an urban water user during the height of the drought.

 

Please see the following links for information on:

Businesses and residents are being asked what they would want Strand CBD to look like in the future, as one of the early steps in a potential regeneration plan.

Their responses will, as a part of a public consultation drive, add great value to a consideration process for a proposed draft plan.

People’s thoughts are being gathered online through an initial questionnaire, that will at a later stage be followed by a survey in the town centre itself.

The prospective plan is being put together by a group of community volunteers under the collective name of ‘Future Strand’, and is supported by the Strand BID.

“The creation of this plan is so important as it will help determine what Strand will look like in future. To create a plan that truly will benefit the town, we need the help of those who know their town best: those who live and work there,” says Grant Goodwin, chair of the Strand BID, the organisation that initiated Future Strand.

The following survey will help us establish which areas to focus on.
It shouldn’t take more than 8 minutes to fill out. Thank you for your participation!

Welcome to your Strand CBD Usage Survey

1. How old are you?
2. Gender
3. Is this your neighbourhood?
4. Which features and services do you use in Strand CBD?
5. Do you work in Strand?
6. How frequently do you visit Strand CBD?
7. How do you normally get to Strand CBD?
8. How would you describe your parking experience in Strand?
9. Do you ever feel unsafe in Strand?
10. Which of the following would you want to see a greater range or improved quality of in Strand?
11. Are there any facilities not present in Strand that you would like to see?
12. Do you visit the flea market?
13. Would you like to see any changes to the flea market?
14. Do you use the train station?
15. Would you like to see any changes to the train station?
16. Do you use the taxi rank?
17. Would you like to see any changes to the taxi rank?
18. Do you use the public swimming pool?
19. Would you like to see any changes to the swimming pool facilities?
20. Which of the following would you like to see more of in the CBD? Choose the 5 you'd like to see happening soonest.
21. How often do you visit Strand at night?
22. If you have any one thing that you would like to happen in Strand CBD, what is that?
23. Would you like to receive news from Future Strand? Please fill your email address in below!

In an effort to continue keeping this special seaside town inviting to both residents and visitors, Strand BID has partnered with an exciting new initiative called Future Strand.

While the BID will continue the good work its been doing with keeping the streets clean and safe, Future Strand wishes to nurture a renewed sense of community within the town.

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To celebrate the launch of our brand new SBID x Future Strand website, we’ll be running a special photo competition for everyone who loves this special seaside town as much as we do! We’re looking for beautiful images that capture the magic of Strand – summery beach scenes, spectacular sunsets, the hustle and bustle of […]

Iconic landmark synonymous with the Strand. Anyone who lived/spent vacations in Strand prior to the early 2000s would remember strolling along it and watching the fisherman patiently waiting for their day’s catch.

It was the spot you went to eat your ice cream and no doubt had its fair share of romantic moonlight strolls.

All in all, a far cry from the unattractive, tattered ruin that remains today.

The question on many lips is: what happened and will it ever be fixed?

We chatted to the Environmental Management Department at the City of Cape Town to gain some insight.

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Sedert die instelling van die SBID (‘Strand Business Improvement District) ‘n paar jaar gelede, heers die algemene mening dat die sakesentrum van die dorp beslis ‘n skoner en veiliger plek vir almal is, en statistieke bevestig dit ook.

Dit dek as ‘t ware die tafel vir die ‘Future Strand’-inisiatief om aan planne te werk wat die Strand hopelik ook ‘n nóg gewilder woon-, werk- en beleggingskeuse sal maak.

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What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word ‘Strand’?

The beachfront, undoubtedly.

Since holidays first became a thing in South African society, Strand has drawn crowds – people in search of the soothing lapping of saltwater and endless stretches of white sand. Before this – and still today – it also served as a sought-after fishing and foraging spot, a place to gather delicacies from the deep.

In between, it has also gathered a reputation as a popular surf spot and – with the recent refurbishment of the promenade and seawall – an excellent place for a scenic jog.

But is the beachfront’s full potential really being harnessed? This question has been weighing heavily on Heinrich Rohwer, a local whose passion for watersports and skateboarding leads him to believe a lot can be done to make this public space even more welcoming.

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There are so many apparent reasons why a museum in the heart of Strand – not necessarily confined to a single building or space, but one that could be appreciated and enjoyed on foot by groups and individuals – is an extremely attractive possibility that surely merits further investigation. This is the opinion of Dr Elma Ross, who is convinced that a museum is imperative as a tourist attraction and of course for heritage purposes.

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THERE are many stories and anecdotes to be told and shared about what Strand used to be like ‘in the good old days’. Taking a fresh look at the coastal town in its current form – compared to what it used to be and where it is heading – will in coming months prove a useful exercise during the process of forging ahead with the Future Strand initiative.

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Public Safety 

The Safety Officers of the SBID are always willing to offer assistance if accidents occur in their area of mandate. They are efficient at directing the traffic, keeping bystanders away from the injured or rendering any service that is needed. 

One such incident occurred in the parking area of Strand Square, when two young men who had been standing on the back of a bakkie, fell off when it turned too fast and the one sustained serious injuries. 

Recently the Strand PSO’s assisted in finding a stray dog that had earlier attacked a Jack Russel through the bars of a fence, pulling it through and almost tearing it apart. With the help of a member of the Strand Neighbourhood Watch the dog was caught and handed over to the Animal Welfare.

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